Arab films showcase turbulent, redemptive year

Mon Oct 24, 2011 11:37am EDT
 
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By Regan Doherty

DOHA (Reuters) - The Arab Spring of pro-democracy uprisings features prominently -- both directly and more subtly -- in the selections at the third annual Doha Tribeca Film Festival, kicking off in the Qatari capital this week.

The festival, launched in 2009 in the tiny Gulf Arab state, seeks to showcase the work of Arab filmmakers who this year were able to draw on the momentous political changes in their own countries for artistic inspiration.

Highlights include "Rouge Parole," set in the tumult of revolutionary Tunisia, which charts the expulsion of its president and the country's first steps toward democracy.

Sherif El Bendary's "On the Road to Downtown," set in Cairo's Tahrir Square, follows the lives and hopes of six people connected in different ways to the city's downtown core.

"Our selection of documentaries provides for reflection on political change. But we also offer a number of films that look into private worlds and subtler aspects of the Middle Eastern experience that are not always evident to political observers," said the festival's Chief Arab Programer, Hania Mroue.

"The Virgin, the Copts and Me" takes on an otherworldly subject in investigating the appearance of the Virgin Mary to millions of Egyptians via a videotape on which only true believers can see her image.

"This is a very important film for post-revolutionary Egypt, as it sheds light on the Coptic community, which was taboo to do a few years ago," Mroue said.

The Algerian title "Normale" examines what happened in the Algerian street as neighboring countries' dictators were being toppled.   Continued...

 
<p>Protesters chant slogans against the government and military rulers at Tahrir Square after Friday prayers in Cairo October 7, 2011. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany</p>