Darth Vader quits the Empire after Goldman resignation

Thu Mar 15, 2012 6:32am EDT
 
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By Elzio Barreto and Clare Baldwin

HONG KONG (Reuters) - If Greg Smith can do it, so can Darth Vader.

The scathing resignation letter of the Goldman Sachs executive has inspired a sheaf of online spoofs written on behalf of several imaginary employees.

Within hours of the New York Times publishing Smith's letter, in which he calls the investment bank a "toxic" place where managing directors referred to their clients as "muppets", the villain of the popular Hollywood sci-fi epic Star Wars also decided to quit via British satirical website, The Daily Mash.

Using many of the same phrases Smith penned in his letter, Darth Vader said he no longer felt at home in the Empire.

"The Empire today has become too much about shortcuts and not enough about remote strangulation. It just doesn't feel right to me anymore," Darth Vader said in his letter.

The spoofs highlight how investment banks such as Goldman Sachs have become household names after the global financial crisis triggered by the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers, and how deeply allegations of corporate greed resonate at a time when recession, joblessness and shrinking incomes have become the norm for many across the globe.

Parodying Smith's righteous tone, columnist Jason Gay penned a resignation letter for New York Knicks coach Mike D'Antoni, who did actually resign from the top-ranked U.S. basketball team on Wednesday.

"Yes, look, I am sorry that I am upstaging the Goldman Sachs guy. I know he probably woke up feeling he was going to dominate the most-emailed list, only to get upstaged by me. What can I say? This is New York, pal," the letter read.   Continued...

 
Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment President Mike Dunn (R) talks to "Darth Vader" as he announces the Blu Ray release of the complete Star Wars movie saga during the first day of the 2011 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada January 6, 2011. REUTERS/Steve Marcus