September 11 attacks, Katrina top list of memorable TV moments

Wed Jul 11, 2012 2:53pm EDT
 
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By Courtney Garcia

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Watching news coverage of the September 11 attacks, Hurricane Katrina disaster, and the O.J. Simpson murder verdict proved to be the most impactful TV moments of the past 50 years in the United States, according to a study released Wednesday.

Television researcher Nielsen and Sony Electronics partnered to find which TV events were the most memorable for audiences. The Challenger space shuttle disaster in 1986 and death of Osama bin Laden rounded out the top five.

"What we were trying to measure was perception," Paul Lindstrom, a senior vice president at Nielsen told Reuters. "The most significant things, when it comes to television, weren't the events, but the moments shared with people. Things like ‘watching baseball with my dad,' seeing the Olympics together, all those types of things brought emotional memories together."

The study questioned 12,000 participants online over three days in February, resulting in 1,077 completed surveys from which results were compiled. Respondents were provided a list of choices selected by media experts that ranged from news coverage such as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963 to pop culture events such as the airing of final episodes of "Friends," "Seinfeld," and "Cheers."

News-oriented items that crossed generations proved to be the most influential TV experiences, and stories of a communal nature or with widespread relevance also resonated with viewers.

Princess Diana's funeral, the Columbine High School shootings in Colorado, the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the 2010 earthquake in Japan and football star O.J. Simpson's famous car chase by police also scored in the top 10.

"What's interesting for me is not what's on the list, but what's not on the list," said Brian Siegel, vice president of television for Sony Electronics. "There wasn't entertainment - no Super Bowl, no "Friends" finale. It was all news and events ... Memories that are ubiquitous among all of us."

Sony commissioned the study to assess emotions that audiences attach to TV with an eye toward boosting its program development and marketing.   Continued...

 
A pair of roses and a U.S. flag are left on one of the panels containing the names of the victims of the attacks on the first day that the 9/11 Memorial was opened to the public at the World Trade Center site in New York, September 12, 2011. REUTERS/Mike Segar