South African photographer who chronicled apartheid dies

Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:53pm EDT
 
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JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Alf Khumalo, a South African photographer whose pictures of the brutalities of the apartheid regime piled pressure on the white-minority government, has died of renal failure at the age of 82.

Khumalo made his name as a photographer for Drum magazine, initially a black lifestyle magazine that was notable for its reportage of township life under the apartheid state.

He photographed some of the most significant moments of the liberation struggle including the student uprisings of the 1970s and captured images of Nelson Mandela when he was released from prison and led the country to its first democratic elections in 1994.

"He was a meticulous photographer and his work will live on forever as a monument to the people's resilience and fortitude in the face of colonial oppression and apartheid," President Jacob Zuma said on Monday after Khumalo died at the weekend.

Former colleague and award winning photo-journalist Peter Magubane described Khumalo as a hardworking man whose apartheid photographs helped free South Africa.

"We were calling the shots and did not believe in being dictated to. We used our cameras as our guns to liberate ourselves and South Africa," Magubane said.

(Reporting by Tshepo Tshabalala and Ndundu Sithole; Editing by Jon Herskovitz and Alison Williams)

 
Former South African President Nelson Mandela (C) arrives with veteran photographers Alf Khumalo (R) and Jurgen Schageberg for a photo exhibition and the launch of a book entitled "The Meaning of Mandela" at the Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg in this July 12, 2006 file photo. REUTERS/Antony Kaminju/Files