Hard times weigh heavily on Iranians on New Year's holiday

Wed Mar 20, 2013 11:04am EDT
 
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By Yeganeh Torbati

DUBAI (Reuters) - These should be prosperous days for Ali Pasha, who owns a tourism company in Dubai that arranges holidays for those seeking a break in the sunny Gulf emirate.

The Iranian New Year on Wednesday, called Nowruz, is typically a time when tens of thousands of Iranians, Pasha's main customers, cross the Gulf to enjoy the city's glitzy hotels, luxury shopping and many beaches.

But the number of Iranian tourists heading for Dubai's shores has slowed significantly this year, and in between answering phone calls and smoking a cigarette in his office on a recent afternoon, Pasha sounded exasperated.

"For Dubai, Iranian tourists used to be very important," he said. "Now they have lost their importance."

He and other local travel agents estimate they have seen a 40 percent drop in the number of Iranian customers compared to last year.

Iranians' purchasing power has decreased following a halving of the value of the rial against the dollar, due largely to several rounds of U.S. and European sanctions over Iran's nuclear program. Some Iranians say they can no longer afford foreign plane tickets, hotel stays and visa fees as a result.

Iran's most important holiday, Nowruz is rooted in ancient Zoroastrian culture and marked by large family gatherings, gifts for children, vacations and spring cleaning (called "house shaking" in Persian).

But Nowruz this year caps 12 months of high inflation and unemployment and comes with no sign of an end to Western sanctions on Iran's energy and banking sectors that have halved the country's oil exports and made it difficult to conduct trade, even in items not banned by the West.   Continued...

 
A table set with decorations is seen at Iranian restaurant Abshar in Dubai March 20, 2013. The Iranian New Year, called Nowruz, the country's most important holiday, is rooted in ancient Zoroastrian culture and marked by large family gatherings, gifts for children, vacations and spring cleaning (called "house shaking" in Persian). Nowruz, which falls on March 20 this year, is typically a time when tens of thousands of Iranians, Pasha's main customers, cross the Gulf to enjoy the city's glitzy hotels, luxury shopping and many beaches. But the number of Iranian tourists heading for Dubai's shores has slowed significantly this year. Nowruz this year caps 12 months of high inflation and unemployment and comes with no sign of an end to Western sanctions on Iran's energy and banking sectors that have halved the country's oil exports and made it difficult to conduct trade. To match story IRAN-NOWRUZ/ REUTERS/Jumana El Heloueh