Pre-Viking tunic found by glacier as warming aids archaeology

Thu Mar 21, 2013 5:16pm EDT
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By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent

OSLO (Reuters) - A pre-Viking woolen tunic found beside a thawing glacier in south Norway shows how global warming is proving something of a boon for archaeology, scientists said on Thursday.

The greenish-brown, loose-fitting outer clothing - suitable for a person up to about 176 cms (5 ft 9 inches) tall - was found 2,000 meters (6,560 ft) above sea level on what may have been a Roman-era trade route in south Norway.

Carbon dating showed it was made around 300 AD.

"It's worrying that glaciers are melting but it's exciting for us archaeologists," Lars Piloe, a Danish archaeologist who works on Norway's glaciers, said at the first public showing of the tunic, which has been studied since it was found in 2011.

A Viking mitten dating from 800 AD and an ornate walking stick, a Bronze age leather shoe, ancient bows, and arrow heads used to hunt reindeer are also among 1,600 finds in Norway's southern mountains since thaws accelerated in 2006.

"This is only the start," Piloe said, predicting many more finds.

One ancient wooden arrow had a tiny shard from a seashell as a sharp tip in an intricate bit of craftsmanship.


A Viking-era woollen mitten found by a shrinking glacier in the mountains of south Norway in 2011 is seen in this undated handout picture released by the Oppland county council March 21, 2013. REUTERS/Oppland county council/Handout