Afghan women, clerics, eye unlikely alliance to improve rights

Tue Jul 16, 2013 5:52am EDT
 
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By Miram Arghandiwal

KABUL (Reuters) - A group of Afghan female lawmakers and activists are eyeing an unlikely alliance with the country's religious leaders, hoping to promote and enhance women's rights through Islam in a joint campaign.

Though Afghan women have made hard-fought gains in education and work since the collapse of the austere Taliban regime in 2001, fears are growing these could suffer a reversal when most foreign forces leave by the end of next year.

In the deeply conservative, male-dominated country where religion often holds more sway than legal authority, religious leaders have often been a major barrier to women obtaining the rights granted to them under the constitution.

"The role of the mullahs is crucial because we're an Islamic nation and the mosques are being used against women. Why not use them for women?" said member of parliament Fawzia Koofi, an outspoken campaigner for women's rights.

Koofi, from the largely rural Badakhshan province, is in talks with the country's male, religious elite to promote pro-female sermons during important Friday prayers in mosques where the government pays clerics' salaries.

The hope is that the sermons will help address the problem of violence against women in a country where many men are suspicious of women's rights and see them as imported from the West.

The campaign will start in Kabul and then be implemented in the provinces but only in 3,500 government-funded mosques. There are 160,000 mosques in the country of 30 million people.

Winning the support of religious leaders for the campaign may seem like a long shot.   Continued...