Introducing the olinguito, the newest mammal discovery

Thu Aug 15, 2013 1:24pm EDT
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By Environment Correspondent Deborah Zabarenko

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The long-tailed, orange-furred, big-eyed olinguito - said to resemble a cross between a house cat and a teddy bear - is the newest mammal and the first carnivore discovered in the Americas in 35 years, the Smithsonian Institution announced on Thursday.

Native to the high, misty cloud forests of Colombia and Ecuador, the olinguito is the smallest member of the raccoon family, according to Kristofer Helgen, a Smithsonian scientist who recognized it as a distinct species 10 years ago.

The "aha" moment occurred not in a South American forest but at Chicago's Field Museum, the creature's discoverer, Helgen said at a news briefing.

"I pulled out a drawer ... and said 'Wow,'" Helgen recalled of his first view of a long-dead 20th century specimen, which had been identified as a related species, the olingo. "It was like nothing I'd ever seen before."

Helgen said the teeth and skull of the specimen were much different from those of an olingo, which is larger and has more prominent ears than the olinguito.

He said he could have published this finding in a scientific journal then, but in the interest of being thorough, he sought out colleagues to confirm the existence of the new species in its natural habitat.

Olinguitos are considered carnivores, even though they eat mostly fruit, Helgen said. These creatures have teeth that look fully capable of eating meat, he added.

They have thick, woolly fur that is brighter than that of the more drab-colored Olingos. Olinguitos are about 2.5 feet (.76 meter) long and weigh about 2 pounds (900 grams). Males and females are about the same size, and females raise a single baby at a time, the scientists said.   Continued...

An "olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina)," described as the first carnivore species to be discovered in the American continents in 35 years, is pictured in a cloud forest in South America, in this July 18. 2013 photograph released on August 15, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Gurney/Smithsonian