Hollywood reflects on race in year of black, civil rights films

Tue Aug 27, 2013 6:47am EDT
 
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By Mary Milliken

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Race in America has been a hot topic of debate this summer and Hollywood, as if on cue, has muscled its way into the conversation.

This year is shaping up to be a big one in film for African American, black and civil rights themes, offering audiences different lenses through which to consider the complex question of racial equality, both historically and in the present day.

In 2011, Hollywood had "The Help," a story of the civil rights struggle among maids in 1960s Mississippi, and in 2012, director Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained" produced a novel take on slavery. Both were nominated for best picture Oscars and did well at the box office.

In 2013, there are half a dozen films to choose from, several from black directors. They include civil rights drama "Lee Daniels' The Butler," which has led the box office for the past two weekends, and Steve McQueen's "12 Years a Slave," the true story of free man who is enslaved, which premieres in October.

Already this year, audiences and critics alike have embraced "42" about Jackie Robinson, the first black to play Major League Baseball after 50 years of segregation, and "Fruitvale Station," the real-life story of Oscar Grant, a young unarmed black man killed by white police in Oakland four years ago.

The slate also includes two biopics on South African anti-apartheid leaders: Nelson Mandela in "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom," due for release in November, and "Winnie Mandela," his former wife, in out in September.

Their release comes against the backdrop of the biggest discussion on race in the United States in years: the trial in the killing of unarmed African American teenager Trayvon Martin and President Barack Obama's explanation in highly personal terms of what it means to be a young black man in America have been the summer highlights.

This week, the country celebrates the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech.   Continued...

 
Director Lee Daniels attends the New York premiere of his film 'The Butler' at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York in this August 5, 2013, file photo. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/Files