Israel mourns death of its king of cool

Wed Nov 27, 2013 10:00am EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Jeffrey Heller

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - For many Israelis, nothing symbolized home more than singer Arik Einstein, and on Wednesday a nation mourned the death of its king of cool.

Einstein, who died of a ruptured aneurysm on Tuesday at the age of 74, was virtually unknown outside of Israel. But generations of Israelis came of age listening to his smooth baritone and folk-rock ballads - a soothing soundtrack of life often drowned out by the din of Middle East conflict.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a statement mourning the passing of a "cultural giant".

Thousands filed past Einstein's coffin lying in state in the Tel Aviv square where the leader he once eulogized in song, Yitzhak Rabin, was assassinated in 1995. Radio stations played Einstein's music throughout the day.

A native-born Israeli, or "sabra", Einstein in the late 1960s helped to change the local music scene by moving away from traditional Hebrew folk music to Western-style pop and rock, forming the country's first commercially successful folk-rock group, "The High Windows".

It was a ground-breaking shift for a country where the government once banned a Beatles tour, fearing it would corrupt Israeli youth.

Largely steering clear of politics in his career and personal life, Einstein voiced a simple and unifying message in a nation riven with divisions: the real Israel - behind the headlines - can be found in the friends, family, sights and sounds that make it home.

"I am sitting on the waterside in San Francisco, taking in the blue and green," he wrote in one of his songs. "Suddenly I want to go home, back to the swamp and to sit in the Kasit (cafe) and laugh with Moshe and Hezkel ... I love falling in love with little Israel."   Continued...

 
A man walks past the coffin of Israeli singer Arik Einstein, depicted in the placard, during a memorial ceremony before his funeral at Rabin square in Tel Aviv November 27, 2013. REUTERS/Nir Elias