No flour? No fish? Venezuela's chefs get creative amid shortages

Tue Jan 28, 2014 8:19am EST
 
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By Brian Ellsworth

CARACAS (Reuters) - A sushi bar in Caracas makes tempura with ground oats and cornstarch to replace increasingly scarce wheat flour.

A Spanish restaurant, seeking to keep its fare affordable, revamps its paella recipe by removing exorbitantly priced prawns.

Restaurateurs selling "arepas" - the grilled corn pancakes that are a staple across the country - make them a bit smaller to stretch their unsteady supplies of corn flour.

Venezuelan diners continue to eat well despite soaring inflation and chronic food shortages, largely thanks to Herculean efforts by chefs to obtain prized foodstuffs and juggle menus to slow the rising prices.

In working-class canteens and high-end bistros, staff say finding basics such as flour, milk or chicken - all scarce, in large part, because of currency and price controls - requires making repeated trips to markets and harassing providers.

"I haven't been able to buy wheat flour or corn flour for more than a month. I'm working with what I had last year," said Eduardo Castaneda, 45, owner of La Guayaba Verde, or The Green Guava, in Caracas, which offers a modern spin on traditional Venezuelan food.

Venezuela's price controls require staple goods be sold at fixed rates that are at times below production cost, which often leaves them scarce because of the reduced incentive for companies to make or import them.

Even the most ethical of restaurateurs are finding themselves dabbling in the black market to skirt the strict regulations created by the late socialist leader Hugo Chavez and extended by President Nicolas Maduro.   Continued...

 
Eduardo Castaneda, 45, chef and owner of La Guayaba Verde restaurant, prepares dishes at the restaurant's kitchen in Caracas January 27, 2014. Venezuelan diners continue to eat well despite soaring inflation and chronic food shortages, largely thanks to Herculean efforts by chefs to obtain prized foodstuffs and juggle menus to slow the rising prices. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins