For Sports Illustrated models, cover makes anything possible

Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:02pm EST
 
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By Patricia Reaney

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Models Nina Agdal, Lily Aldridge and Chrissy Teigen were already at the top of their game, but the trio say anything is possible after gracing the cover of the Sports Illustrated 50th Anniversary Swimsuit Edition that hit newsstands on Tuesday.

They joined an illustrious club of former swimsuit models, including Christie Brinkley, Heidi Klum, Elle Macpherson and Tyra Banks, with their topless cover photo that appears in the most widely read edition of the magazine. It will be seen by about 70 million readers in print and online.

"Doing a Sports Illustrated cover opens so many doors," said Aldridge, a 28-year-old California brunette, who landed the cover in her first shoot for the magazine.

She was already a Victoria's Secret model, the wife of Caleb Followill of the Grammy-winning band Kings of Leon, and the mother of their young daughter when she did the photo shoot last October in the Cook Islands with 21-year-old Danish model Agdal and fellow American Teigen, 28.

But Aldridge said being chosen for the cover was a huge surprise and an amazing opportunity.

"You really can do anything," she told Reuters in an interview with her cover mates. "You can start a brand. You can build a company. It's incredible."

The group photo of Aldridge, Agdal and Teigen, smiling and arm in arm, posing in bikini bottoms while peering over their shoulders with their backs to the camera, is the first cover since 2006 to have multiple models - and only the fifth in the magazine's history.

Agdal is making her third appearance in the swimsuit issue, but the 50th anniversary edition will be her first cover, along with Teigen, who has been in every issue since her debut in 2010.   Continued...

 
2014 Sports Illustrated cover models Nina Agdal (L), Lily Aldridge and Chrissy Teigen (R) pose for a portrait in New York February 18, 2014. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri