New Swedish government weighs quotas for women on company boards

Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:17pm EDT
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STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - A new Swedish government could introduce quotas to bring more women onto company boards if businesses don't act themselves during the next two years, a spokesman for the Green Party said on Wednesday.

The Green Party looks set to be the junior coalition partner in the incoming government headed by the Social Democrats, who became the biggest party in a general election on Sept 14.

Women are expected to fill a number of key cabinet posts in the new government, which will be announced on Friday, including that of finance minister and foreign minister.

"We are sending a clear signal to the big companies that if by 2016 they don't have at least 40 percent of women on their boards, then we going to try and get a law passed in parliament," Green Party spokesman Gustav Fridolin said.

Scandinavia has among the highest percentage of female parliamentarians in the world and a feminist party fell only just short of the four percent of votes necessary to win parliamentary seats in this month's ballot.

However, women have a far harder time reaching top posts in the private sector.

Women make up 29 percent of the non-executive boards of Swedish blue-chip companies, ahead of the European average of 20 percent, according to data from the European Union. But Sweden lags behind countries like Iceland and Norway.

In 2003, Norway became the first country in the world to impose a gender quota requiring at least 40 percent of public limited company board members to be women.

Other countries, including France, the Netherlands and Spain, have followed with similar requirements.   Continued...