Morning dance parties let 'conscious clubbers' rise and rave

Mon Aug 17, 2015 7:35am EDT
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Martinne Geller

LONDON (Reuters) - Blaring house music, colored lights, glittery faces and gyrating bodies are not your typical weekday morning. But that's the way it is for growing numbers of health-minded 20-somethings and retired clubbers no longer keen on all-night partying.

Morning dance parties with names like "Morning Gloryville" and "Daybreaker" are gathering steam in cities across the world, giving rise to a movement known as "conscious clubbing".

Its founders aim to create the energy and community of electronic dance parties with fruit smoothies and coffee instead of the drugs and alcohol more common after nightfall.

"It's about changing the way people think. It's about expanding hearts and minds," said Samantha Moyo, the 28-year-old founder of Morning Gloryville, whose recent Tuesday morning party at London's famed club Ministry of Sound attracted several hundred people from 6:30 to 10:30 a.m.

Attendees were greeted by hosts offering "Free Hugs," yoga practice and massages. Other parties offer tickling workshops, sleepovers and pillow fights.

"We're trying to create a sober festival in an urban environment," said Moyo, who grew up between Zimbabwe and England and previously worked as an event planner. "Our thing is very much about bringing the flower power back into the cities."

Daybreaker co-founder Matthew Brimer says his events are part dance party, part immersive theater that aim to take advantage of life's unspoilt hours.

"There was already nightlife," Brimer thought in 2013 when he threw the first party in New York. "What if we created morninglife?" The results were better than expected.   Continued...

 
A DJ reacts as club-goers dance at 'Morning Gloryville' at the Ministry of Sound in south London August 11, 2015. Morning dance parties with names like "Morning Gloryville" and "Daybreaker" are gathering steam in cities across the world, giving rise to a movement known as "conscious clubbing". Its founders aim to create the energy and community of electronic dance parties with fruit smoothies and coffee instead of the drugs and alcohol more common after nightfall. Picture taken August 11, 2015. REUTERS/Toby Melville