Bush's daughters advise Obama girls to have fun

Tue Jan 20, 2009 8:22pm EST
 
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WASHINGTON (Reuters Life!) - As George W. Bush vacates the White House, his twin daughters have passed on some advice to the Obama girls -- find loyal friends, slide down the banisters, and remember who your dad really is.

Barbara and Jenna Bush, 27, reflected on their years in the White House in an open letter to 10-year-old Malia Obama and her 7-year-old sister Sasha, in the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday.

"We also first saw the White House through the innocent, optimistic eyes of children," they wrote, acknowledging their seven-year-old perspectives when their grandfather George Bush was sworn in as the 41st president in 1989.

"Our seven-year-old imaginations soared as we played in the enormous, beautiful rooms; our dreams, our games, as romantic as her surroundings. At night, the house sang us quiet songs through the chimneys as we fell asleep."

The twins returned to the White House in 2001 after their father was elected 43rd president of the United States.

"The White House welcomed us back and there is no doubt that it is a magical place at any age," wrote Jenna, an author and school teacher, and Barbara, who has worked for various museums and charities.

The twins advised the Obama girls to "absorb it all, enjoy it all," as four years goes by fast. But they also gave more specific advice:

- surround yourself with loyal friends

- if you're traveling with your parents over Halloween, don't let it stop you from doing what you would normally do   Continued...

 
<p>U..S President Barack Obama's daughters Malia (L) and Sasha Obama watch the inaugural parade from their father's reviewing stand in Washington January 20, 2009. Barack Obama became the first black U.S. president on Tuesday and declared it is time to set aside petty differences and embark on a new era of responsibility to repair the country and its image abroad. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>