People would rather lose wallet than cellphone

Fri Sep 4, 2009 8:17am EDT
 
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By Miral Fahmy

SINGAPORE (Reuters Life!) - Cellphone feels like a part of your body? A global survey has found that most people can't live without their mobiles, never leave home without them and, if given a choice, would rather lose their wallet.

Calling mobile phones the "remote control" for life, market research firm Synovate's poll said cell phones are so ubiquitous that by last year more humans owned one than did not.

Three-quarters of the more than 8,000 respondents polled online in 11 countries said they take their phone with them everywhere, with Russians and Singaporeans the most attached.

More than a third also said they couldn't live without their phone, topped by Taiwanese and again Singaporeans, while one in four would find it harder to replace the mobile than their purse.

Some two-thirds of respondents go to bed with their phones nearby and can't switch them off, even though they want to, because they're afraid they'll miss something.

"Mobiles give us safety, security and instant access to information. They are the number one tool of communication for us, sometimes even surpassing face-to-face communication. They are our connections to our lives," Jenny Chang, Synovate's managing director in Taiwan, said in a statement.

Mobiles have also changed the nature of relationships, with the survey finding nearly half of all respondents use SMSes to flirt, a fifth set up first-dates via text and almost the same number use the same method to end a love affair.

Apart from the obvious calling and SMS-ing, the top three features people use regularly on their mobile phones globally are the alarm clock, the camera and the games.   Continued...

 
<p>Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner puts a piece of foreign currency back in his wallet after showing off the contents of his wallet to a photographer during a break in his testimony before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on General Government and Financial Services on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 21, 2009. REUTERS/Jim Bourg</p>