Green products join fight against climate change

Fri Oct 16, 2009 8:07am EDT
 
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By Sugita Katyal

SINGAPORE (Reuters Life!) - A radio made of wood. A bag crafted from recycled ring pulls from drink cans. And a stylish lamp made from old Vespa scooter parts.

A figment of some designer's imagination, right?

Wrong. They are actually among a range of eco-products showcased by social group Qi Global at Singapore's National Museum as part of its wider efforts to protect the planet.

Qi says all the products are aimed at breaking the general perception that eco-products are inferior in quality and lacking in aesthetics.

But, more importantly, they're meant to save the world from the impact of climate change.

Apart from the Vespa lamp and the radio of sustainably grown wood designed by Indonesian Singgih Kartono, the lineup of eco-carbon products includes sneakers made from left-over skin of fish for food, solar mobile chargers and tiny hydrogen-powered cars.

"Imagine that one day in the far distant future, perhaps sitting sipping wine on a beach while playing with our grandchildren, we'll tell them: 'Once upon a time we tackled something called global warming...'," said Mette Kristine Oustrup, one of the founders of Qi Global.

Describing them as "good energy products," Oustrup said demand for low-carbon goods would increase as people compared them with "bad energy" products which are made by child labor or which use toxins.   Continued...

 
<p>Green Chair and Dustbin creations are displayed at the Qi exhibition in Singapore in this October 14, 2009 handout photo. A range of eco-products was showcased by social group Qi Global at Singapore's National Museum as part of its wider efforts to protect the planet. Apart from the Vespa lamp and the radio of sustainably grown wood designed by Indonesian Singgih Kartono, the lineup of eco-carbon products includes sneakers made from left-over skin of fish for food, solar mobile chargers and tiny hydrogen-powered cars. REUTERS/Handout</p>