Caviar? Golden cake? The world's most extravagant meals

Tue Dec 8, 2009 9:02pm EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

SINGAPORE (Reuters Life!) - The finest ingredients and top chefs are key components to the best dining experiences, but it can be the added extras that make meals or venues memorable.

Forbes.com has compiled a list of 11 of the world's most extravagant meals (here). Reuters has not endorsed this list:

1. Daniel Boulud's Caviar - New York City At $205, Daniel's tasting menu is a relative bargain compared to other high-end Manhattan eateries but care for some Champagne and caviar in the lounge before dinner? Fifty grams of Boulud's private-label Caspian Sea Golden Ossetra caviar goes for $860.

2. The French Laundry - Napa Valley

Even the wiliest concierges have trouble scoring reservations at Chef Thomas Keller's The French Laundry. Each day Keller and his staff create two nine-course $240 menus - a chef's "tasting" menu and a "vegetable" menu - promising not to repeat a single ingredient on either menu.

3. $1,000 Sultan's Golden Cake - Istanbul Upon request the pastry chef at hotel the Ciragan Palace Kempinski will prepare a "golden cake" that has been flavored with fruits marinated for years in Jamaican rum, vanilla beans from French Polynesia and French wheat. But what makes this the ultimate bakery bling is the dusting of 24-karat edible gold.

4. White Truffle Dinner at Les Amis - Singapore For special clients, Les Amis, the elegant French restaurant in Singapore, can arrange a top-to-bottom white truffle menu that starts at $800 per person, not including wine.

5. $5,000 Fleur Burger - Las Vegas

Created by Fleur de Lys chef Hubert Keller, the man behind Burger Bar in the Mandalay Bay hotel, this burger contains kobe beef, truffles and foie gras. The real cost comes with the concoction's accompaniment -- a bottle of 1995 Chateau Petrus from Bordeaux.   Continued...

 
<p>France's caviar in Bordeaux, December 12, 2005. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau</p>