London's Canary Wharf scoops corporate art prize

Thu Nov 4, 2010 3:41pm EDT
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LONDON (Reuters Life!) - London's Canary Wharf has won the Christie's award for best corporate art collections and programs handed out at the 2010 International Art & Work Awards in Barcelona on Thursday.

The prize, which focuses on the last three years, recognized what the judges called Canary Wharf Group's "sophisticated approach to integrating art into the landscaping and the buildings on their shopping and business district in London."

George Iacobescu, chief executive of CWG added: "We are very pleased our efforts to bring character, culture and color to a previously derelict part of London have been recognized as among the world's best."

Canary Wharf, now a major financial district in London, is home to over 90,000 workers and features around 60 permanent art works by 45 artists in public spaces.

Also shortlisted for the Christie's award were Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena in Italy, Barclays Capital in Britain, Deloitte in Australia, Deutsche Bank in Germany, K11 Concepts in Hong Kong and Populous in Britain.

The award for the best work of art commissioned for a specific site was won by U.S. artist Barbara Neijna for "Foreverglades," a major installation at the new Miami International Airport.

The lifetime achievement award for outstanding contribution to art in the working environment went to Deutsche Bank.

The Deutsche Guggenheim global partnership exhibition hall in its Berlin offices features four exhibitions each year and the company recently introduced an artist of the year award.

The final prize for the best building designed to display works of art, sponsored by International Art Consultants, will be judged live and announced at the World Architecture Festival in Barcelona on Friday.

(Reporting by Mike Collett-White)

<p>The Canary Wharf financial district is seen during mid-evening in East London March 26, 2009. REUTERS/Toby Melville</p>