Russia uses extremism law to target dissenters

Thu Dec 16, 2010 6:01am EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Alissa de Carbonnel

MOSCOW (Reuters) - When armed Russian security officers forced their way into Alexander Kalistratov's home, he hardly imagined they were after his books.

The local leader of a congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses in Siberia now faces up to two years in prison if found guilty this week of inciting religious hatred for distributing literature about his beliefs.

"They swept everything from my shelves without even bothering to sort it, even my bible," Kalistratov, a street sweeper, said by telephone from the Siberian town of Gorno-Altaysk, 3,600 km (2,200 miles) east of Moscow.

His trial is the first of a dozen pending against Jehovah's Witnesses and scores of others caught up in the widening net of criminal prosecutions brought under Russia's anti-extremism law.

Rights activists say the vaguely worded legislation, first passed in 2002, is increasingly being exploited by the authorities to persecute religious minorities, intimidate the media and clamp down on opposition activists.

"This law is used by various officials for their own personal aims," said Alexander Verkhovsky, whose SOVA rights group monitors hate crimes, extremism and religious freedoms.

"In practice, it's a universal tool. It can be used to target anybody ... political, religious or even completely apolitical groups such as labor union activists."

The law -- ostensibly aimed at combating potential terrorist threats -- was used earlier this year to fine two prominent Moscow curators a combined 350,000 roubles ($11,300) over an controversial Pop Art exhibition in Moscow and to impose a ban on the popular Internet portal YouTube in Russia's Far East.   Continued...

 
<p>Alexander Kalistratov, the local leader of a Jehovah's Witnesses congregation, arrives for a court session in the Siberian town of Gorno-Altaysk, December 16, 2010. Kalistratov now faces up to two years in prison if found guilty this week by a Russian court of inciting religious hatred for distributing literature about his beliefs. REUTERS/Alexandr Tyryshkin</p>