Japan government to face first suit on surnames

Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:16am EST
 
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By Yoko Kubota

TOKYO (Reuters Life!) - After nearly fifty years of persevering with a life under her husband's surname, 75-year-old Kyoko Tsukamoto is taking the Japanese government to court so that she can at least bear her own name when she dies.

"My husband and I still love each other, but this and the issue of Tsukamoto are different," she said.

The former teacher uses her maiden name, but due to Japanese civil law requirements she had to take her husband's name when she married to make the union legal.

But debate over the surname issue, long a sore point with some women, has heated up as more women stay in jobs after marriage and juggle two names -- their maiden name at work and their registered name on legal documents.

"I thought that I would get used to my husband's name, but I could not, and a sense of loss grew inside me," Tsukamoto said.

"Now I am 75 and I was shocked to realize that I can't do things anymore that I used to be able to do last year. That's when I thought that I am Kyoko Tsukamoto and I want to die as Kyoko Tsukamoto."

Tsukamoto is one of five people planning to file a lawsuit against the government and local authorities as early as February, saying the civil code that requires married couples to register under the same surname violates equal rights among married couples, as well as personal rights.

Men are allowed to take their spouses' name, but it is rare.   Continued...