Philip Roth wins Man Booker International Prize

Wed May 18, 2011 5:32am EDT
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Pauline Askin

SYDNEY (Reuters Life!) - U.S. novelist Philip Roth, lauded for books such as the controversial "Portnoy's Complaint," won the biennial Man Booker International Prize on Wednesday for a body of work stretching over more than half a century.

Considered a master of capturing American identity and anguish, the 78-year-old Roth has received a number of other awards including two National Book Awards and a Pulitzer Prize.

"For more than 50 years, Philip Roth's books have stimulated, provoked and amused an enormous and still expanding audience," said Rick Gekoski, chair of the judging panel.

"His career is remarkable in that he starts at such a high level, and keeps getting better. In his 50s and 60s, when most novelists are in decline, he wrote a string of novels of the highest, enduring quality."

In a video message, Roth said he was honored.

"One of the particular pleasures I've had as a writer is to have my work read internationally despite all the heartaches of translation that entails," he added.

The Man Booker International Prize honors a writer's body of work as opposed to the annual Man Booker Prize for Fiction, which is awarded for a single book.

Other nominees for the award included Rohinton Mistry, Philip Pullman, Anne Tyler, and -- for the first time -- two Chinese novelists, Wang Anyi and Su Tong.   Continued...

 
<p>Author Philip Roth poses in New York in this September 15, 2010 file photo. U.S. novelist Roth, lauded for books such as the controversial "Portnoy's Complaint," won the biennial Man Booker International Prize on May 18, 2011 for a body of work stretching over more than half a century. REUTERS/Eric Thayer/Files</p>