For optimal work commitment, skip the pot?

Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:15pm EST
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Genevra Pittman

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - According to a real shocker from the world of bona fide science, smoking marijuana is tied to less motivation at the office.

The author of the study said it can't prove whether that's due to the drug's effects, the social environment in which it's used or whether pot smokers are just more likely to be laid-back from the get-go.

Though researcher Christer Hyggen suspects pot is the culprit, another possible explanation is that people who aren't so happy with their work situation or motivated on the job are more likely turn to drugs.

"There's a popular belief that people who smoke cannabis are slackers and that they don't want to work," Hyggen, from the Oslo-based social research institute NOVA, told Reuters Health.

To see how well that perception held up, he analyzed data from a 25-year-long study of close to 1,500 Norwegians. Starting in 1987, when they were in their late teens and early 20s, participants filled out surveys that included questions on their recent pot use on five different occasions, into their 40s.

They also rated their attitudes on statements that reflected work commitment, such as "It is very important for me to have a job" and "I feel restless when I have no work to do," ranked on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 reflecting the most commitment.

People who reported smoking in the past year generally reported less dedication to work than abstainers, according to findings published in the journal Addiction.

The pattern held after Hyggen took into account their mental health, satisfaction with their work environment, their economic background and how much alcohol they drank.   Continued...