Retired judge Otton to lead investigation into UCI

Fri Nov 30, 2012 10:36am EST
 
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(Reuters) - Former Court of Appeal judge Philip Otton will chair the three-member commission set up to investigate allegations made against the International Cycling Union (UCI) over the Lance Armstrong doping scandal, the UCI said on Friday.

The retired judge, who has dealt with Formula One disputes at the International Court of Appeal, will work with Britain's 11-times Paralympic champion Tanni Grey-Thompson and Australian lawyer Malcolm Holmes.

The UCI said last month it would set up an independent commission to address issues and allegations which arose during the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) investigation into Armstrong and the U.S. Postal Team.

The commission, assembled by the International Court of Arbitration for Sport president John Coates, will be independent from any other sports body, the UCI said.

"The appointment of these three eminent figures demonstrates clearly that the UCI wants to get to the bottom of the Lance Armstrong affair and put cycling back on the right track," UCI president Pat McQuaid said in a statement.

"As I have said previously, the Commission's report and recommendations are critical to restoring confidence in the sport of cycling and in the UCI as its governing body," he added.

"We will co-operate fully with the Commission and provide them with whatever they need to conduct their enquiry and we urge all other interested stakeholders to do the same. We will listen to and act on the Commission's recommendations."

The commission is to hold a hearing in London in April and will submit its report to the UCI by June 1, 2013 or shortly afterwards.

In the coming two weeks, the UCI will also announce details of a stakeholder consultation to look at the future of cycling and discuss how to bring in lasting improvements, as well as to tackle other issues of concern, the governing body said.   Continued...