UCI disbands Armstrong independent commission

Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:28pm EST
 
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(Reuters) - Cycling's world governing body is disbanding the Independent Commission which investigated the Lance Armstrong doping scandal in favor of a "truth and reconciliation process", the UCI said on Monday.

The UCI said the commission was being disbanded following talks with World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) president John Fahey.

"He (Fahey) confirmed WADA's willingness to help the UCI establish a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), as well as saying that WADA had no confidence in the existing Independent Commission process," UCI president Pat McQuaid said in a statement.

The three-member independent commission set up last year to look into allegations against the world body complained last week it had not received any documents from the UCI and had met resistance from athletes and stakeholders.

"We have listened carefully to the views of WADA, USADA and cycling stakeholders and have decided that a truth and reconciliation process is the best way to examine the culture of doping in cycling in the past and to clear the air," added McQuaid.

The TRC process, in which McQuaid expects WADA to be "fully engaged", is expected to launch later this year with a report to be published in full. A management committee meeting is scheduled for Friday to further discussions.

McQuaid made it clear last week that the UCI could not afford two separate inquiries, particularly as one involving WADA would likely be longer and broader.

Indications that WADA would share the costs with the UCI, given that it wanted Armstrong to testify, were ruled out by McQuaid.

"There is still a huge amount to discuss before we can finalize a detailed legal framework, including how such a TRC, which is completely unprecedented in sport, should be funded now that WADA contrary to earlier indications refuses to contribute financially," he said.   Continued...

 
Discovery Channel team rider Armstrong passes the Arc de Triomphe in Paris after winning his seventh Tour de France. Discovery Channel team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. passes the Arc de Triomphe in Paris after winning his seventh Tour de France, July 24, 2005. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer