Singapore joins probe into match-fixing scam

Tue Feb 5, 2013 6:29pm EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Justin Palmer

LONDON (Reuters) - Singapore, which European investigators say is the source for hundreds of soccer matches being fixed in a global betting scam, promised on Tuesday to aid the probe but some in the game said many of the revelations were nothing new.

About 680 suspicious matches including qualifying games for the World Cup and European Championships, and the Champions League for top European club sides, have been identified in an inquiry by European police forces, the European anti-crime agency Europol and national prosecutors.

"The authorities in Singapore are assisting the European authorities in their investigations into an international match-fixing syndicate that purportedly involves Singaporeans," the Southeast Asian city-state's police said in a statement.

"Singapore takes a strong stance against match-fixing and is committed to working with international enforcement agencies to bring down transnational criminal syndicates, including those that involve the acts of Singaporeans overseas, and protect the integrity of the sport."

Investigators said about 380 of the suspicious matches were played in Europe, and a further 300 were identified in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

The fixing could also include top-flight national league matches in several European countries, as well as two Champions League matches, including one played in Britain.

Danish newspaper Ekstra Bladet said that match was Hungarian side Debrecen's 2009 Champions League group match against Liverpool.

The report caused barely a ripple at Debrecen who said on Tuesday that it was merely raking over old ground.   Continued...

 
The trophy for the UEFA Champions League is seen on the pitch prior to the Champions League quarter-final second leg soccer match between Bayern Munich and Olympique Marseille in Munich, April 3, 2012. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach