Blatter angry with UEFA over declaration on FIFA reforms

Sun Feb 10, 2013 11:37am EST
 
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By Mike Collett

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - FIFA president Sepp Blatter took a swipe at European governing body UEFA on Sunday for what he said were attempts to block his reform process to make soccer's governing body more transparent and less prone to corruption.

Blatter said he was surprised that UEFA, headed by Michel Platini who is a possible rival for the FIFA presidency in two years' time, had declared itself against key proposals from FIFA's reform working party the Independent Governance Committee (IGC).

UEFA, in a declaration last month, rejected a proposal to limit FIFA executive committee members to two four-year mandates and called for the FIFA president to serve a maximum of 12 years instead of the eight put forward by the IGC.

Blatter, who was in South Africa for Sunday's African Nations Cup final, said it was UEFA's job to consult their national associations, not to issue their own declaration on the proposals.

"The reform process is on the way to conclusion," he told a media round-table meeting. "Two parts have been implemented by Congress: the establishment of an independent ethics committee and the fact Congress and not the executive committee will choose future World Cup hosts.

"Now there are 10 or 11 other points that have to be dealt with by the next FIFA Congress in Mauritius in May. So I'm surprised by the reaction of UEFA, because the executive committee told the confederations they should consult their national associations about the reforms and what they think about the last part of the amendments to the statutes.

"And I'm surprised because it did not seem like a consultation, it seemed like was decision-making from UEFA where the national associations have signed a declaration against this.

"The idea was that at the FIFA Congress, all national associations have the right to speak on the amendments in favor or against. We have asked the confederations to make consultations, we have not asked them to make decisions.   Continued...

 
FIFA President Sepp Blatter reacts during a news conference after being re-elected for a fourth term as president of world soccer's governing body during the 61st FIFA congress at the Hallenstadion in Zurich June 1, 2011. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann