Internet governance talks in jeopardy as Arab states, Russia ally

Fri Dec 7, 2012 11:31pm EST
 

By Joseph Menn

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A landmark attempt to set global rules for overseeing the Internet threatened to fall apart on Friday as a rift pitting the United States and some Western countries against the rest of the world widened, participants in the talks said.

A 12-day conference of the International Telecommunications Union, taking place in Dubai, is supposed to result in the adoption of a new international treaty governing trans-border communications.

But in a critical session at the midpoint of the conference on Friday, delegates refused to adopt a U.S.-Canadian proposal to limit the treaty's scope to traditional communications carriers and exclude Internet companies such as Google, the ITU said on its website.

Further complicating the negotiations was what a U.S. official at the talks called the "surprise" announcement of an accord among some Arab states, Russia and other countries to pursue treaty amendments that are expected to include Internet provisions unacceptable to the United States

A still-secret draft of the coalition's proposals is to be introduced soon by the United Arab Emirates, the official said.

"It doesn't look good," said a former U.S. intelligence official tracking the talks for private technology clients.

The emergence of the new coalition, whose members are generally seeking greater Internet censorship and surveillance, is likely to harden battle lines separating those countries from the United States and some allies in Western Europe.

The United States and others objected to the introduction of complex new material midway through the conference.   Continued...