Pope says import of arms to Syria a "grave sin"

Fri Sep 14, 2012 3:03pm EDT
 

By Philip Pullella and Erika Solomon

BEIRUT (Reuters) - Pope Benedict appealed on Friday for a halt to the flow of arms into Syria, saying it would help end a civil war that has killed many thousands of people and which Christians fear could bring Islamists to power.

In his strongest comments yet on the conflict, Benedict branded the weapons imports as a "grave sin" as he arrived at the start of a three-day visit to Beirut, the Lebanese capital just 50 km (30 miles) from the Syrian border.

He also described Arab uprisings as a positive "cry for freedom" as long as they included religious tolerance - the central theme of Benedict's trip which is focused on promoting peace in the Middle East and harmony between its minority Christians and majority Muslims.

Christian, Sunni and Shi'ite Muslim and Druze religious leaders joined Lebanon's political elite in greeting Benedict on his arrival in a region now rocked by violent protests against an American film that denigrates Islam.

"The import of weapons has to finally stop," Benedict, 85, told journalists on the plane. "Without the import of arms the war cannot continue. Instead of importing weapons, which is a grave sin, we have to import ideas of peace and creativity."

The Arab Spring uprisings against authoritarian leaders were "a positive thing. There is a desire for more democracy, more freedoms, more cooperation and renewal," he said.

But he added that it had to include tolerance for other religions. Asked about Christian fears about rising aggression from Islamist radicals, Benedict said: "Fundamentalism is always a falsification of religion."

All main faith groups in Lebanon, which was gripped by civil war along sectarian lines from 1975 to 1990, have welcomed his visit. Among banners greeting Benedict on the road from the airport were several from the militant Shi'ite group Hezbollah.   Continued...

 
Pope Benedict XVI waves as he arrives at Beirut's airport, September, 14, 2012. REUTERS/Jamal Saidi (LEBANON - Tags: RELIGION)