Harsher energy regulations coming in Obama's second term

Wed Nov 7, 2012 2:08am EST
 
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(Reuters) - Energy companies likely will see more regulation in President Barack Obama's second term, with less access to federal lands and water even as the administration promotes energy independence.

With a pledge to cut oil imports by half by 2020, Obama during the campaign advocated what he called an "all of the above" approach to developing a range of domestic energy sources. He said, however, that he would roll back subsidies for oil companies and reduce the nation's reliance on oil by mandating production of more fuel-efficient vehicles.

"You are going to have less access to federal lands and tougher government agencies," said Dan Pickering, chief investment officer at TPH Asset Management in Houston.

Obama's energy strategy over the last four years has shifted away from focusing on climate change after a bill establishing a cap-and-trade system to curb carbon emissions died in the Senate in 2010 after a bitter partisan fight. The president's green policies also suffered a major setback when solar power company Solyndra collapsed last year after receiving a $535 million loan guarantee, unleashing a political firestorm.

Obama's team of energy advisers include Energy Secretary Steven Chu, a Nobel prize-winning scientist who specializes in alternative and renewable energy technologies but who regularly talks up the government's role in developing hydraulic fracturing technology. His top White House energy adviser is Heather Zichal, who has been an advocate for creating green jobs and tackling climate change by reducing dependence on oil.

Obama has pledged more support for development of renewable energy technologies like solar and wind, but he will need the support of Congress to extend or renew tax breaks that have underpinned the growth of those industries.

"Obama can love solar as much as he wants, but I don't know that a whole lot more is going to happen in terms of new, constructive policy," said Morningstar energy analyst Stephen Simko.

Perhaps most importantly, however, renewable energy faces major obstacles unrelated to policy, such as stiff competition from low-priced natural gas, a lack of infrastructure to connect large projects to the grid, and a global glut of solar panels that is putting their manufacturers out of business.

Here are more details on how companies in various energy sectors will fare under President Obama's second term:   Continued...

 
U.S. President Barack Obama, who won a second term in office by defeating Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, waves as he addresses supporters during his election night victory rally in Chicago, November 7, 2012. REUTERS/Jeff Haynes