NATO aims to repair Russia ties despite Patriot row

Sun Dec 2, 2012 10:12am EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Adrian Croft

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - NATO foreign ministers, meeting for the first time this week since Russia appointed a new ambassador to the military alliance, are hoping to improve ties with Moscow despite a fresh row over plans to send anti-aircraft missiles to Turkey.

A NATO spokeswoman said the meeting aimed to "re-energize" relations with Russia - whose cooperation is needed both on ending the conflict in Syria and smoothing the withdrawal of most foreign combat troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014.

The twice-yearly meeting on Tuesday and Wednesday will also discuss funding for Afghanistan forces after 2014, and will be preceded by a visit to NATO headquarters in Brussels by Pakistan Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar.

Russia appointed a new ambassador to NATO in October after a 10-month gap, raising hopes for an improvement in ties, strained by U.S. and NATO plans to construct a missile shield around Europe as well as last year's NATO bombing campaign in Libya.

NATO and Russia have, however, have been at odds over how to end the 20-month revolt in Syria. Russia has vetoed U.N. Security Council resolutions aimed at increasing pressure on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to step down.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, who meets NATO ministers including U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Tuesday, is expected to raise concerns over plans to deploy Patriot surface-to-air missiles on NATO member Turkey's border with Syria.

"We will tell them (the Russians) ... that this is defensive and not there to establish a no-fly zone," a senior NATO official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said.

The NATO meeting coincides with a visit by Russian President Vladimir Putin to Turkey, where he is expected to face fresh calls to help bring an end to the war in Syria.   Continued...

 
A woman walks past the NATO logo at the entrance of the Alliance headquarters ahead of a NATO foreign ministers meeting in Brussels December 4, 2003. REUTERS/Thierry Roge