September 30, 2009 / 9:31 PM / 8 years ago

Economy doesn't change perfect job ideals: study

NEW YORK (Reuters Life!) - The recession has scarcely affected U.S. workers’ definition of their ideal job, with most saying their concept of the perfect post would be the same if the economy improves, according to a new study.

<p>Applicants line up at a booth offering vocational services at a career fair held as part of the National Urban League's Economic Empowerment Tour in Dallas, Texas June 13, 2009. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi</p>

U.S. workers cite good pay, health insurance and opportunity for advancement as their top priorities in their ideal jobs, according to the Randstad Work Watch study conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs, to be released on Thursday.

Nearly two-thirds said in a perfect job, they would do the same work they are doing now, while one-fifth said they would choose a different job in the same field.

One in five U.S. workers said the ideal job would involve a completely different line of work.

The survey showed most workers “enjoy their jobs, regardless of the impact the economy has made on their jobs,” Eric Buntin, managing director of operations for Randstad, said in a statement.

“It would be easy to peg the economy for a shift in the definition of the perfect job, but that doesn’t seem to be the case,” he said.

The survey showed 83 percent of workers would not alter their definition of a perfect job if the economy improves, and 17 percent would do so.

Asked what perks would be included in the perfect job, a whopping 81 percent said five weeks of vacation, 56 percent said free lunch and 40 percent said a lifetime gym membership.

Women were more likely than men to say in their ideal job that they would be doing the same work they are now, by a ratio of 42 to 35 percent, but men were more likely to wish they had a different job in the same field, 26 to 19 percent.

Three in 10 workers said in their perfect job, they would have more responsibility and 42 percent said the same amount as they do now. Six percent would want less responsibility.

The nationwide online survey included 1,008 adults interview from August 28 to September 1, 2009.

Randstad US is a wholly owned subsidiary of Randstad Holding, a global provider of professional employment and staffing services.

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