January 23, 2017 / 8:05 AM / 8 months ago

Turkey dismisses deputy head of TMSF state fund in post-coup decree

ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Turkey has dismissed a deputy head of the state fund which runs seized companies and shut down two local television stations in decrees issued on Monday under the emergency rule imposed in the wake of last July’s failed coup.

The Official Gazette said Zulfukar Sukru Kanberoglu of the TMSF fund was one of 367 people dismissed from state institutions under the latest four decrees, which also reinstated 124 civil servants.

It said the people were dismissed for being members of, or having links to, terror groups or groups which act against national security.

Broadcaster Haberturk said on Saturday prosecutors had issued arrest warrants for more than 400 people, including soldiers and security officers, in 48 provinces across the country following July’s failed coup.

They were being sought on suspicion of using Bylock, an encrypted smartphone messaging app the government says was used by the network of Fethullah Gulen, accused by Ankara of orchestrating the attempted coup, Haberturk reported.

Gulen, a U.S.-based cleric who has lived in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania since 1999, has denied the charge and condemned the coup.

In a post-coup crackdown, Turkey has jailed about 40,000 people pending trial and has suspended or dismissed more than 100,000 from the military, judiciary and public services.

More than 240 people were killed in the July 15 attempted putsch, in which soldiers commandeered tanks and fighter jets in a bid to seize power.

Turkey will set up a commission to investigate potential complaints over emergency rule dismissals and the closure of media outlets and other associations, one of the decrees said.

The commission will have seven members including judges and prosecutors, many appointed by the government, it said.

The detention period for holding suspects without charge, which was increased to 30 days when emergency rule was imposed, will be cut to a maximum of seven days, although prosecutors can issue an order to extend it by another week under certain circumstances.

Reporting by Can Sezer and Humeyra Pamuk; Writing by Daren Butler; Editing by Nick Tattersall and Janet Lawrence

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